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Old 20-02-2022, 06:07 PM
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BalloonblowerNYC BalloonblowerNYC is offline
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Default How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
I found this here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWrHVQDD1JE


The interesting here for me is that the pressure to overcome to actually make a new balloon begin to inflate is nearly the same as at the moment it pops doing as b2p.

And yes, I can feel the rising pressure to put more air in the balloon when it does not have manufacturing defects.
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Old 20-02-2022, 06:46 PM
RubberTech RubberTech is offline
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
A good production process maintains consistent thickness of the latex over the entire surface of the balloon. The pressure inside an inflated balloon is greater than the pressure outside it. The balloon is stable because the expanding force due to the pressure difference is balanced by the contracting force exerted by the surface tension of the rubber so if there is a thin spot in the latex then this area will be the first to fail and the surface tension will disperse from this point.
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Old 20-02-2022, 06:51 PM
RubberTech RubberTech is offline
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
Here is a diagram showing what I'm talking about:
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Old 20-02-2022, 06:53 PM
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
OK...here it is:
Attached Images:
File Type: png Surface_tension.png (104.8 KB, 94 views)
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Old 20-02-2022, 07:33 PM
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
Two Modes of Balloon Bursting Revealed:
https://physics.aps.org/articles/v8/105
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Old 20-02-2022, 08:31 PM
Scaredyburst Scaredyburst is offline
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
As far as I can remember from my A-level physics, the excess pressure (internal minus external) is 2T/r there T is the the surface tension (depending on the substance, thickness etc) , and r is the radius.

Hence, for the same material, when the diameter is small, the excess pressure is high - hence the pressure inside modelling balloons (small radius) is very high - and almost impossible to inflate by mouth.
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Old 20-02-2022, 08:35 PM
Scaredyburst Scaredyburst is offline
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
Funny, I was just thinking yesterday of doing a pressure versus diameter plot of my new balloons - cos the black ones were MUCH harder to blow up.

Can you get pressure gauges of the right range easily?

Black, dark green, red 12" balloons from the same ebay supplier.
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Old 26-02-2022, 11:09 AM
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
Originally Posted by Scaredyburst View Post
Can you get pressure gauges of the right range easily?
Use pressure gauge from sphygmomanometer unit - they are scaled in mmHg, but you can easily convert to other units.
In my experiment 12" Belbal balloon burst at 55 mmHg.
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Old 26-02-2022, 08:53 PM
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
That's around 1psi, I'd expect much higher
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Old 28-02-2022, 03:19 AM
Common Loon Common Loon is offline
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Default Re: How about some scientific approach on balloon popping? :-)
Originally Posted by srob2 View Post
That's around 1psi, I'd expect much higher
Yeah it's kinda surprising but 1 psi isn't that uncommon a burst pressure for a latex balloon. Not as much overpressure as we often imagine. Though as was said upthread, that pressure varies inversely with the radius (or directly with the mean curvature of the balloon, which covers non-spherical shapes as well)... so if a 12" balloon bursts at 1 psi, a 6" of the same material and thickness would burst at 2 psi and so forth.

There's a YouTuber named hiyoko who has several "Balloon Test" videos B2P'ing balloons with a pressure and volume gauge attached, like this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfW4WUU1I_g

Also an entire fetish studio has picked up on this trend, hehehe:
https://www.clips4sale.com/studio/53...ion-laboratory
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