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  • Rezotto
    Junior Member
    • May 2024
    • 8

    Secret

    I recently bought an Intex beach ball 107 cm long. My parents almost never rummage through my things or in my room. However, if they urgently need something, they are ready to turn everything upside down. I need advice on where I can hide a beach ball in my room without being found even in these circumstances? I will be glad to any advice. Thank you
  • Markus_Looner
    Junior Member
    • Apr 2024
    • 17

    #2
    I used to hide my loons and "other things parents don't need to see" in a set of drawers, well not really in, but under. I used to completely remove the bottom drawer and lay the items flat on the ground so that the drawer could then pass over the top. (Hope I described it well). I'm not sure of your furniture or if a decent sized ball would fit, but it's worth looking at.

    Comment

    • Bass Boll
      Member
      • Jun 2023
      • 70

      #3
      Dear Rezotto,

      first of all, congratulations to your purchase! Is it one of the historic Intex Jumbos which went out of production about 25 years ago? Envy. (How much did you pay for it?) Of course, such a treasure must be kept safe, secure, and secret.

      Not so long ago I wrote a post discouraging a university freshman from leaving his stash in his parents' house. Anything in your room is in danger of being exposed if you are blessed with curious parents. So my first advice would be: get your toy out of the house, hide it in a place somewhere around the corner from where you can fetch it when you have the house to yourself. This adds the feature of plausible deniability (anybody else could have dumped a piece of plastic behind the water butt), but you don't want your toy in danger of being found by other people, so you need to find a perfect hiding place. This might be impossible if you live in a city, though.

      The major downside of such an external storage is that you cannot simply grab your toy at night when you get the urge. So let's have a look around your room – what is the best you can achieve in terms of lowering the risk of exposure as much as possible.

      I would say the philosopher's stone is "hidden extra space" (HXS). Like the space below the lowermost drawer bottom mentioned above. But your ball must fit in: Any object too large put here may easily produce noise and friction and call for a closer examination. Another idea would be an envelope or pizza box glued flat to the top of a drawer slot, so that it cannot be seen, only be fingered, filled or emptied through a half-open drawer. Of course the likewise prepared drawer must not be filled to the brim.

      A rather safe possibility which however needs advanced DIY capabilities and a lot of alone time is to double a table or desk top or the seating of a stool from below. Special consideration needs the way in which the added plywood layer or parts of it can easily (but not accidentally!) be removed to access the HXS. In any case the manipulation has to blend in as if it had always been there, so it isn't easily installed.

      If you are lucky, HXS are readily provided by some parts of the existing furniture. I remember a time when steel tubes of 3 in | 8 cm diameter were popular for table legs. The feet were removable plastic disks – there you are.

      Theoretically possible but dangerous are spaces within electronic devices. An empty hardware slot in a vintage PC casing comes to mind. But the intestines of these things are dangerous: There may be voltage left even after pulling the plug, some parts become very hot, etc. Hands off from electrics!

      Have a look at textiles. Is there a winter coat hanging in your wardrobe? Check if you can access sufficient HXS in its interlining from a pocket. All it takes is to slit the inside of the pocket (old shoplifter trick). Any large cuddly toys around? But be aware that setting in a micro-zipper needs mature sewing skills.

      A final idea would be an unsuspicious paper envelope in the bag you regularly carry around all day. What is not at home cannot be found while you are away.

      Comment

      • Rezotto
        Junior Member
        • May 2024
        • 8

        #4
        Originally posted by Bass Boll
        Dear Rezotto,

        first of all, congratulations to your purchase! Is it one of the historic Intex Jumbos which went out of production about 25 years ago? Envy. (How much did you pay for it?) Of course, such a treasure must be kept safe, secure, and secret.

        Not so long ago I wrote a post discouraging a university freshman from leaving his stash in his parents' house. Anything in your room is in danger of being exposed if you are blessed with curious parents. So my first advice would be: get your toy out of the house, hide it in a place somewhere around the corner from where you can fetch it when you have the house to yourself. This adds the feature of plausible deniability (anybody else could have dumped a piece of plastic behind the water butt), but you don't want your toy in danger of being found by other people, so you need to find a perfect hiding place. This might be impossible if you live in a city, though.

        The major downside of such an external storage is that you cannot simply grab your toy at night when you get the urge. So let's have a look around your room – what is the best you can achieve in terms of lowering the risk of exposure as much as possible.

        I would say the philosopher's stone is "hidden extra space" (HXS). Like the space below the lowermost drawer bottom mentioned above. But your ball must fit in: Any object too large put here may easily produce noise and friction and call for a closer examination. Another idea would be an envelope or pizza box glued flat to the top of a drawer slot, so that it cannot be seen, only be fingered, filled or emptied through a half-open drawer. Of course the likewise prepared drawer must not be filled to the brim.

        A rather safe possibility which however needs advanced DIY capabilities and a lot of alone time is to double a table or desk top or the seating of a stool from below. Special consideration needs the way in which the added plywood layer or parts of it can easily (but not accidentally!) be removed to access the HXS. In any case the manipulation has to blend in as if it had always been there, so it isn't easily installed.

        If you are lucky, HXS are readily provided by some parts of the existing furniture. I remember a time when steel tubes of 3 in | 8 cm diameter were popular for table legs. The feet were removable plastic disks – there you are.

        Theoretically possible but dangerous are spaces within electronic devices. An empty hardware slot in a vintage PC casing comes to mind. But the intestines of these things are dangerous: There may be voltage left even after pulling the plug, some parts become very hot, etc. Hands off from electrics!

        Have a look at textiles. Is there a winter coat hanging in your wardrobe? Check if you can access sufficient HXS in its interlining from a pocket. All it takes is to slit the inside of the pocket (old shoplifter trick). Any large cuddly toys around? But be aware that setting in a micro-zipper needs mature sewing skills.

        A final idea would be an unsuspicious paper envelope in the bag you regularly carry around all day. What is not at home cannot be found while you are away.
        Thank you very much for your response. As for the ball, you can easily purchase it in my country on Ozon or Wildberrys. Unfortunately, the toy burst when I was left alone due to playing too hard (I sat on the seat with a valve, which caused it to come apart at the seams). Regarding your advice, you have given me many alternatives. I will definitely try using one of these in the near future. thanks again

        Comment

        • heaviest
          Senior Member
          • Jun 2018
          • 529

          #5
          The danger of hiding it too well is that if it's found, anyway, it will look to have been hidden, which will raise even more curiosity. Why does this coat crinkle? What is this drawer catching on?

          Maybe hide it medium-well, like in a box of books. You might also think of a reason you have it, in case it is found. To put your feet up on? A beach ball not quite filled actually works okay for that. If you're really thorough, have an answer for "why aren't you using it for that?" Uh...it works okay but isn't as comfy as I was hoping?

          My mom once rifled through my room looking for something of hers that was missing. Fortunately she was too irritated to be curious about other stuff she found, because she found a popped air mattress under my bed. We had a pool, but this wasn't a toy she'd bought. Too irritated to wonder too much, though.

          Comment

          • MylarLover
            Mylar Balloon Lover
            • Apr 2023
            • 85

            #6
            a long time ago when I was a teenager and living with my parents, I had bought small Mylar Balloons at a store around 10 of them and I hide them in a closet in my room and my parents never found out about it.

            Comment

            • Bass Boll
              Member
              • Jun 2023
              • 70

              #7
              Originally posted by heaviest
              You might also think of a reason you have it, in case it is found. To put your feet up on? A beach ball not quite filled actually works okay for that.
              Yes, that is what I meant by "plausible deniability". But while you may be able to justify one jumbo beach ball by whatever made-up reason, it will hardly work if more than one item pointing to an uncommon personal preference has to be explained. That is why I'd favour a good hiding place. The crinkling coat and the drawer catching on something are finally just examples of sub-optimal concealment.

              Of course you can never guarantee 100% secrecy as long as you have stuff in your room (hence my first thought of not keeping it there at all). MylarLover's perception is actually the same I had when I, as a kid, kept my beach balls under the slatted frame of my bed. I did this for years, and then a remark dropped by my father (triggering an immediate change of subject by my mother) revealed to me that they knew for long what was going on!

              Comment

              • ChefBoyjordee
                Junior Member
                • Aug 2023
                • 11

                #8
                To be honest, I was kinda open about it because I always gave a good excuse. When I was working a kids camp for a first time, I was able to justify the purchase of lots of balloons and inflatables for "use at camp", even though none of them actually were brought to the camp and stayed in my closet. I only had to hide things when there was no plausible excuse, such as balloons or inflatables clearly not meant for reasonable purposes. Now, my parents never figured it out, and as soon as I went off to college, all of it came with me and never returned back.

                Comment

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