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  #11  
Old 13-02-2018, 02:09 PM
Bubblyzzz Bubblyzzz is online now
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Default Re: First home made balloon
There are a couple of guys I know that make homemade balloons a lot. They are on the balloon buddies list, so if you join it, you might be able to get hints, etc.
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  #12  
Old 14-02-2018, 12:52 AM
onemoreblow onemoreblow is offline
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Default Re: First home made balloon
That would be great. I do want to make a guide, so any info to include would help others also.
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Old 18-02-2018, 05:27 AM
onemoreblow onemoreblow is offline
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Default Re: First home made balloon
Here is a "Q23" .. lol not sure if the name really fits but it's bigger than the 17" one by a lot. It is blown up a bit tighter than the last one but still not full. We will see how big it gets

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File Type: jpg q23.jpg (140.9 KB, 63 views)

Last edited by onemoreblow; 18-02-2018 at 11:54 PM.
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Old 18-02-2018, 07:06 PM
Bubble Boy :-P Bubble Boy :-P is offline
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Default Re: First home made balloon
That is like.....the coolest thing!
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Old 18-02-2018, 11:49 PM
onemoreblow onemoreblow is offline
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Default Re: First home made balloon
FYI about formers - I have tried wood, sculpey, plastic, epoxy coated 3d printed (ABS and PLA), glass test tubes, etc. I settled on aluminum. Here's why.

1) Anything that floats is annoying because it is difficult to keep submerged in hot water. It's much better if the former will hang on its own.

2) Anything that melts is a poor choice because it has to endure high temperatures, at least 200 F without deforming, ideally higher. The ideal material should naturally retain some heat.

3) Aluminum plate meets all criteria, can be machined at home, doesn't require baking in a kiln at 2000 F, and doesn't chip, crack or shatter. It's inexpensive and easy to order online. It can be heated to 300 F and beyond without deforming, and when submerged into the coagulant it steams and evaporates almost immediately.

Less drying time = faster production rate for at home purposes.

Aluminum plate can be milled with just a conventional router and wood carving bits because it's much softer than steel. It also doesn't give you splinters and create sparks or fine dust like steel does, and doesn't require a lubricant when machining in this manner. There is no drying time and expensive epoxy coating. Aluminum can be machined and ready to use in under an hour.

I didn't even polish the aluminum after machining except to knock the burrs down, and it works fine without any coating (other than the burned on carbon deposits )

The only disadvantage so far is creating 3d parts. This would require tig welding some aluminum plate together, or casting. That's way more complicated than I am willing to take on yet.

The formers below are made from 12x3.5" aluminum plate. The paper towel width should give you an idea of scale.

Attached Images:
File Type: jpg formers.jpg (163.2 KB, 39 views)

Last edited by onemoreblow; 19-02-2018 at 12:01 AM.
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