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Old 14-10-2018, 12:33 PM
justasimpleusername justasimpleusername is offline
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Default Liquid latex
Anyone knows where I can buy liquid latex for making custom loons? And will latex for characterization work?
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Old 15-10-2018, 11:59 PM
onemoreblow onemoreblow is offline
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Default Re: Liquid latex
There are a few suppliers in the US.... Monster Makers, Holden latex, and Burman's to name a few. For Poland, I don't know. But be aware, it will be ruined if it freezes in transit. Temperatures here are quickly dropping.
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Old 16-10-2018, 03:16 PM
justasimpleusername justasimpleusername is offline
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Default Re: Liquid latex
So will it work? There are some liquid latex suppliers in Poland. For 10 oz. of it you must pay about 8 PLN which is around 2.40$
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Old 16-10-2018, 04:57 PM
OverTheTop OverTheTop is offline
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Default Re: Liquid latex
I've seen this guide, and while it seems reputable, I haven't tried it myself. If you do try it, let us know how it goes; I've been somewhat curious about making my own balloons as well.
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Old 17-10-2018, 09:54 AM
scuba scuba is online now
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Default Re: Liquid latex
I have tried painting liquid latex on my body.
The end result was a suit of not very stretchy latex
I think that you will get the same result if you where to make a balloon of the liquid latex you can buy
But that is just my experience. I have nerver tried making balloons so i do not know if it might work
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Old 19-10-2018, 06:46 PM
onemoreblow onemoreblow is offline
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Default Re: Liquid latex
It depends on the type of liquid latex. I have made balloons with mask latex, but they are totally different and much harder to work with. You can also use thicker latex, and it ends up making a balloon, but not something that you want to play with (too thick).

Freezing ruins liquid latex because the water freezes out and the remaining latex ends up being a coagulated lumpy mess. Unusable for balloons.

It also has a shelf life, so you have to use it or it slowly goes bad. The unused portion has to go in a sealed container. Which brings to the next point.

The container you are dipping in has to be big enough to accommodate the formers you are using, which can mean a fairly large container and therefore a fairly large amount of latex. 5 gallons is about $275 USD. That's enough to make a lot of small balloons (probably 1000), or a good number of very large balloons, probably 250. Depends on the amount of defects.

The latex has to sit undisturbed for 4-10 days for the air bubbles to settle out of it, or you end up with pinholes and church windows all over. Once the dipping tank is filled, it's best not to move it, and then dip a lot of balloons in succession. So having a good number of formers is a plus.

Dipping the formers in coagulant gives the balloons a professional appearance. It makes a huge difference in how well the latex adheres to the former and reduces the amount that drips off and is wasted also. It increases the thickness of the balloon (you can control this by how long the coagulant coated former remains submerged in latex) and makes it more even.

Stripping the balloons requires two things. Step 1. They have to be dried (ideally inside of a warm enclosure. I use a metal cabinet and a space heater). Once the water and ammonia has evaporated from the latex, it fully cures and can be inflated. Step 2. They will be very sticky, so talc powder is a must, first the outside and then the inside as it is coming off the former. If you use talc in the coagulant, you can strip them a lot easier, but it's a separate issue of its own.

The stripped balloons have to be leached in hot water. I use a strainer and a beer brewing kettle with digital temperature control. There are simpler/cheaper options, like a 5 gallon bucket and a plugin bucket heater. The leaching finishes curing the latex and gets rid of harmful latex allergens/proteins. It also rinses away the remaining coagulant, which is a major skin irritant.

Finally you can inflate immediately, or put the finished balloons into a dryer and talc them for later.
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